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Thursday 11 July 2024  Add your comment
One bank cuts home loan rates

Westpac has cut three of its home loan terms between 10 and 25 basis points.

The biggest cut is to its one-year rate which is down to 6.89% and 7.49% for its Special and Standard rates respectively.

To see how it stacks up against other lenders check our table here where we have sorted on lowest to highest one-year rate.

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RBNZ introducing macroprudential tools 'soon'

Loan-to-value restrictions would be difficult to implement and less effective if they were not applied across the board,  the Reserve Bank said in its six-monthly financial report, out today.

Wednesday, May 8th 2013, 11:02AM 3 Comments

by Susan Edmunds

The report is the latest indication of the Reserve Bank’s intentions for macroprudential tools to target asset price bubbles and enhance stability. Tools being considered include loan-to-value restrictions, counter-cyclical capital buffers and sectoral requirements.

Governor Graeme Wheeler said house prices increases were a risk to financial stability in New Zealand, and some borrowers were leaving themselves exposed to risk by taking out large loans with minimal deposits.

Banks were more willing to lend to customers with less equity, he said, leaving borrowers with higher debt levels relative to both their income and assets. That would leave them vulnerable to either a drop in incomes or a rise in interest rates.

“Given that interest rates are at historical lows and will likely rise in the future, lenders should ensure borrowers will be able to service loans even if interest rates rise substantially.”

The Reserve Bank said it would “soon” be able to use the macroprudential framework to tighten settings during periods of systemic risk. It said the tools were needed because the existing framework might not be enough to contain a build-up in risks during extremes in the credit cycle.

But as yet the Bank has not decided when they would be implemented.

“Macroprudential instruments would be used to help manage extremes in credit and asset price cycles, although the tools would need to be deployed early enough to ensure they would meet the intended objectives.”

The Bank agreed that macroprudential tools could result in borrowers going to non-bank lenders who were not subject to its rules, but said that would be mitigated by the fact the tools were only temporary solutions.

One of the most talked-about macroprudential tools is a restriction on loan-to-value ratios, to reduce the level of “risky” lending and reduce the house price momentum generated by people being able to borrow large amounts with small deposits.

Some commentators have said that across-the-board LVR restrictions would unfairly disadvantage first-home buyers and areas of the country where house prices are static.

But the Bank said exemptions were not necessarily appropriate and could dent the tools’ effectiveness. It said exempting first-home buyers would only be possible if first-home buyers were not the ones driving risky borrowing.  Exempting by region might be possible but would present some practical difficulties.

The Bank said it was reviewing submissions it had received on the tools.  “The next steps in the establishment of the macro-prudential policy framework are expected to include a Memorandum of Understanding between the Reserve Bank and the Minister of Finance. This will set out the objectives of the policy, the Reserve Bank’s powers to use macroprudential policy, an agreed set of policy instruments and governance and accountability arrangements. Following this, it is expected that the technical implementation details for each of the instruments will be incorporated into the Banking Supervision Handbook over time. This design process will draw on further consultation with the banks.”

« Interest rate warning for borrowersKiwibank switches home loan specials to two year term »

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Comments from our readers

On 9 May 2013 at 7:25 am Darcy said:
This worked in Vancouver, Canada around this time last year and was quite effective. Too effective perhaps - the collateral damage was unfortunately the first home buyers - not sure if this type of free-market interference is something that a small economy like NZ should really be playing with.
On 10 May 2013 at 10:32 am Johnny said:
Squeeze out the first home buyers but leave in the Boomers and Category 2 migrant investors? Won't help housing affordability in any way, that's for sure. A market rising 5% a year, even only for 2 years, will mean any 95% buyer today has close to 20% equity rather quickly anyway.
On 14 May 2013 at 2:57 pm Marko said:
In Canada they did this and the market stalled, although other factors contributed to this as well. Seems the quick fix is LVR restrictions that will only take out the poor first time buyers. Why not get rid of auctions? Look at the recent REINZ figures and in the notes they comment about the rise in Auctions in AKL, and similar rise in prices. Yet other areas whose auction process is a lot less, you don't see the hockey stick rise in values. Auctions drive up prices and kill first time buyers.

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Mortgage Rates Table

Full Rates Table | Compare Rates

Lender Flt 1yr 2yr 3yr
AIA - Back My Build 6.19 - - -
AIA - Go Home Loans 8.74 7.14 6.75 6.39
ANZ 8.64 7.74 7.39 7.25
ANZ Blueprint to Build 7.39 - - -
ANZ Good Energy - - - 1.00
ANZ Special - 7.14 6.79 6.65
ASB Bank 8.64 7.14 6.75 6.39
ASB Better Homes Top Up - - - 1.00
Avanti Finance 9.15 - - -
Basecorp Finance 9.60 - - -
Bluestone 9.24 - - -
Lender Flt 1yr 2yr 3yr
BNZ - Classic - 7.14 6.79 6.65
BNZ - Green Home Loan top-ups - - - 1.00
BNZ - Mortgage One 8.69 - - -
BNZ - Rapid Repay 8.69 - - -
BNZ - Std, FlyBuys 8.69 7.74 7.39 7.25
BNZ - TotalMoney 8.69 - - -
CFML Loans 9.45 - - -
China Construction Bank - 7.09 6.75 6.49
China Construction Bank Special - - - -
Co-operative Bank - First Home Special - 6.79 - -
Co-operative Bank - Owner Occ 8.40 6.99 6.79 6.65
Lender Flt 1yr 2yr 3yr
Co-operative Bank - Standard 8.40 7.49 7.29 7.15
Credit Union Auckland 7.70 - - -
First Credit Union Special - 7.45 7.35 -
First Credit Union Standard 8.50 7.99 7.85 -
Heartland Bank - Online 7.99 6.89 6.55 6.35
Heartland Bank - Reverse Mortgage - - - -
Heretaunga Building Society 8.90 7.60 7.40 -
HSBC Premier 8.59 - - -
HSBC Premier LVR > 80% - - - -
HSBC Special - - - -
ICBC 7.85 7.05 6.69 6.59
Lender Flt 1yr 2yr 3yr
Kainga Ora 8.64 7.74 7.35 6.99
Kainga Ora - First Home Buyer Special - - - -
Kiwibank 8.50 7.99 7.79 7.55
Kiwibank - Offset 8.50 - - -
Kiwibank Special - 6.99 6.79 6.65
Liberty 8.59 8.69 8.79 8.94
Nelson Building Society 9.00 7.65 7.25 -
Pepper Money Advantage 10.49 - - -
Pepper Money Easy 8.69 - - -
Pepper Money Essential 8.29 - - -
SBS Bank 8.74 7.74 7.09 6.95
Lender Flt 1yr 2yr 3yr
SBS Bank Special - 7.14 6.49 6.35
SBS Construction lending for FHB - - - -
SBS FirstHome Combo 6.19 6.14 - -
SBS FirstHome Combo - - - -
SBS Unwind reverse equity 9.95 - - -
Select Home Loans 9.24 - - -
TSB Bank 9.44 7.79 7.55 7.45
TSB Special 8.64 6.99 6.75 6.65
Unity 8.64 6.99 6.79 -
Unity First Home Buyer special - 6.55 6.45 -
Wairarapa Building Society 8.60 6.95 6.85 -
Lender Flt 1yr 2yr 3yr
Westpac 8.64 ▼7.49 7.35 6.99
Westpac Choices Everyday 8.74 - - -
Westpac Offset 8.64 - - -
Westpac Special - ▼6.89 6.75 6.39
Median 8.64 7.14 6.82 6.65

Last updated: 11 July 2024 1:26pm

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