tmmonline.nz  |   landlords.co.nz        About Good Returns  |  Advertise  |  Contact Us  |  Terms & Conditions  |  RSS Feeds

NZ's Financial Adviser News Centre

GR Logo
Register free for JLL Future Cities Wellington here Dismiss
Last Article Uploaded: Monday, April 12th, 7:04AM

News

rss
Latest Headlines

Tightening tax rules threaten housing investment

Following the Reserve Bank’s (RB) hiking of the official cash rate yesterday, it highlighted that investigations into other ways to cool the housing market are underway.

Friday, March 9th 2007, 12:00AM

by The Landlord

By Andrea Milner

RB governor Bollard said the bank was working with other government agencies to tighten the tax rules applying to housing investment.

It is also looking at ways to change bank capital requirements to moderate the housing cycle, he says.

The housing market has so far been relatively impervious to the RB’s attempts to rein it in, because over 80% of mortgages are fixed rate mortgages. This shields borrowers from the effects of an OCR move in the near-term.



While a law change to block investment property owners’ ability to offset losses on their properties against their tax liability on other income is being mooted, such supplementary stabilisation measures are more of an issue for the next housing cycle, not the current cycle, says Westpac research economist Dominick Stephens.

“Work on developing a policy could be six months away, and then implementing the policy will soak up even more time. In the meantime, the RB will be setting the OCR as normal.”

“We don’t think that supplementary instruments will have any bearing on monetary policy settings this year at all.”

The Reserve Bank may also change the amount of capital banks have to put aside to back up any mortgage loan.

Stephens says the capital adequacy measures being considered are part of a wider banking supervision work programme designed to bring New Zealand into line with international banking regulation norms set out in the Basel 2 agreement.

The suggestion involves requiring banks to hold more cash in times of strong housing lending. In turn, that would impose a cost on bank lending, meaning banks would have to charge higher mortgage rates to cover their costs.

One consequence of requiring banks to hold more cash is that the money sits “dead” in the system, Stephens says. “A cost is imposed on borrowers and bank shareholders, without being a benefit to anybody.”

“Economists call this a ‘dead weight loss’.”

By comparison, using the OCR encourages more savings at the same time as it discourages borrowing, he says. “The OCR is a more efficient instrument, as it helps deal with a number of problems at the same time: excessive borrowing and inadequate savings.”

 


« Property investors refocus on cash flowFree Investment Property Showcase Events: Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch »

Special Offers

Commenting is closed

 

print

Printable version  

print

Email to a friend
News Bites
Latest Comments
  • Are robots the future of advice?
    “Yeah/Nah another article talking financial advisers but really means to say financial planning... The bespoke needs of...”
    5 days ago by JPHale
  • [The Wrap] FSLAA isn't the only big change advisers need to be aware of
    “I watch with hope that FMA will decide to investigate potential and existing sharp practices that are nothing less than fraudulent,...”
    6 days ago by Chatterbox
  • Are robots the future of advice?
    “The majority of the 9,000 consumers surveyed globally said that they trust robots more than humans to help manage their personal...”
    6 days ago by All hat no cattle
  • Are robots the future of advice?
    “What a load of tripe - produced by someone with something to gain. The global experiment with RoboAdvice has demonstrated...”
    6 days ago by Pragmatic
  • Are robots the future of advice?
    “Of course Oracle would produce research supporting their products!! No surprise there. However, I doubt very much if serious...”
    6 days ago by dcwhyte
Subscribe Now

Mortgage Rates Newsletter

Daily Weekly

Previous News

MORE NEWS»

Most Commented On
Mortgage Rates Table

Full Rates Table | Compare Rates

Lender Flt 1yr 2yr 3yr
AIA 4.55 2.29 2.59 2.65
ANZ 4.44 2.89 3.25 3.39
ANZ Special - 2.29 2.69 2.79
ASB Bank 4.45 2.29 2.59 2.65
Basecorp Finance 5.49 - - -
Bluestone 3.49 3.34 2.99 3.34
BNZ - Classic - 2.29 2.59 2.79
BNZ - Mortgage One 5.15 - - -
BNZ - Rapid Repay 4.60 - - -
BNZ - Std, FlyBuys 4.55 2.89 3.19 3.39
BNZ - TotalMoney 4.55 - - -
Lender Flt 1yr 2yr 3yr
CFML Loans 4.95 - - -
China Construction Bank 4.49 4.70 4.80 4.95
China Construction Bank Special - 2.65 2.65 2.80
Credit Union Auckland 5.45 - - -
Credit Union Baywide 5.65 3.95 3.85 -
Credit Union South 5.65 3.95 3.85 -
First Credit Union Special 5.85 2.95 3.45 -
Heartland Bank - Online 2.50 1.99 2.35 2.45
Heretaunga Building Society 4.99 ▼3.40 ▲3.50 -
HSBC Premier 4.49 2.25 2.35 2.65
HSBC Premier LVR > 80% - - - -
Lender Flt 1yr 2yr 3yr
HSBC Special - ▲2.25 - -
ICBC 3.69 2.25 2.35 2.65
Kainga Ora 4.43 2.67 2.97 3.13
Kainga Ora - First Home Buyer Special - 2.25 - -
Kiwibank 3.40 3.20 3.50 3.50
Kiwibank - Offset 3.40 - - -
Kiwibank Special 3.40 2.35 2.65 2.65
Liberty 5.69 - - -
Nelson Building Society 4.95 3.20 3.24 -
Pepper Essential 4.79 - - -
Resimac 3.39 3.35 2.99 3.35
Lender Flt 1yr 2yr 3yr
SBS Bank 4.54 2.79 2.79 3.15
SBS Bank Special - 2.29 2.29 2.65
Select Home Loans 3.49 3.34 2.99 3.34
The Co-operative Bank - First Home Special - 2.09 - -
The Co-operative Bank - Owner Occ 4.40 2.29 2.59 2.79
The Co-operative Bank - Standard 4.40 2.79 3.09 3.29
TSB Bank 5.34 3.09 3.29 3.45
TSB Special 4.54 2.29 2.49 2.65
Wairarapa Building Society 4.99 3.55 3.49 -
Westpac 4.59 3.09 3.29 3.39
Westpac - Offset 4.59 - - -
Lender Flt 1yr 2yr 3yr
Westpac Special - 2.29 2.69 2.79
Median 4.55 2.73 2.99 2.80

Last updated: 7 April 2021 10:22am

About Us  |  Advertise  |  Contact Us  |  Terms & Conditions  |  Privacy Policy  |  RSS Feeds  |  Letters  |  Archive  |  Toolbox
 
Site by Web Developer and eyelovedesign.com